Waratah Waratah (Telopea speciosissima)  Photo: Dianne Page

There's almost 2,300 species of native plants in the GBMWHA across 162 families.

12 families, between them, contain over 60% of the species -

241 - Fabaceae * - Pea Flowers, Acacias
196 - Myrtaceae - Eucalypts
186 - Orchidaceae - Orchids
156 - Poaceae - Grasses
149 - Asteraceae - Daisies
114 - Cyperaceae - Sedges
98 - Proteaceae - Banksias, Grevilleas
69 - Ericaceae - Heaths
66 - Rutaceae - Boronias
49 - Lamiaceae - Mints
33 - Rhamnaceae - Pomaderris
31 - Apiaceae - Flannel Flower

Fabaceae *  Until recently the Mimosaceae (Acacia) and Caesalpiniaceae (Senna) families were separate families. They are now subfamilies, together with Faboideae (pea flowers), of the Fabaceae family.  See here.

Dwarf Purple Flag Dwarf Purple Flag  (Patersonia longifolia)
Photo: Alan Page

39 families only have one species in the GBMWHA; whilst 91 have 5 of fewer species.

Of the 2,300 species, 95 are threatened and 359 protected. See here.

In addition, there are over 400 exotic or introduced species - weeds. See here.

The information is compiled from BioNet and PlantNET for the GBMWHA's seven national parks and the Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve as of May 2016.

More details of the analysis can be found at the foot of this webpage.

Here's a list of the GBMWHA flora species.

The Waratah Software website contains over 240 images of Blue Mountains wildflowers.

biodiversity

The GBMWHA was inscribed on the World Heritage list due to its biodiversity - especially its number of Eucalypt species.

The Nomination for World Heritage quoted "over 1,500 flora species". It now stands at 2,300 - and is increasing.

vegetation communities

The landscape, geology, microclimates and fire histories of the Greater Blue Mountains are very diverse, and give rise to a rich ecological diversity. This is well expressed by the variety of vegetation in the World Heritage Area, which contains:

some of our floral families
Fabaceae (Pea Flowers, Acacias)
Gorse Bitter Pea Gorse Bitter Pea  Daviesia ulicifolia
Photo: Alan Page
There are 241 native species of the Fabaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 8 are vulnerable and 3 are endangered.

The endangered species are -

The sub-family breakdown is as follows -

With some 19,500 species worldwide, it is the third largest flora family. It could be called the legume, pea and bean family.

Myrtaceae (Eucalypts, Tea-trees, Bottlebrushes)
Scribbly Gum Scribbly Gum  (Eucalyptus sclerophylla)
Photo: Alan Page
There are 196 native species of the Myrtaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 24 are protected.

Of these 23 protected species, 13 are vulnerable and 5 are endangered.

The endangered species are -

The 1998 World Heritage Nomination lists 90 Eucalypt taxa. This combines Eucalyptus, Angophora and Corymbia species.

Current analysis shows 109 - Eucalyptus (99), Angophora (6) and Corymbia (4).

Orchidaceae (Orchids)
Spotted Sun Orchid Spotted Sun Orchid
(Thelymitra ixioides var. ixioides)

Photo: Alan Page
There are 186 native species of the Orchidaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 150 are protected.

Of these 150 protected species, 3 are vulnerable and 3 are endangered.

The endangered species are -

At 28,000 species the Orchidaceae family is the world's largest plant family.

The vanilla bean comes from the Vanilla planifolia orchid.

Poaceae (Grasses)
image to come ...
There are 156 native species of the Poaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 1 is vulnerable.

The vulnerable species is -

The Poaceae family includes wheat, corn, rice and bamboo.

Asteraceae (Daisies)
Silky Daisy Bush Silky Daisy Bush  (Olearia erubescens)
Photo: Alan Page
There are 149 native species of the Asteraceae family in the GBMWHA of which 8 are protected, 2 are vulnerable and 1 is endangered.

The vulnerable species are -

The endangered species is -

The Asteraceae family is the world's 2nd largest floral family and includes lettuce and artichokes, and the Calendula and Echinacea genera.

Cyperaceae (Sedges)
image to come ...
There are 114 native species of the Cyperaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 6 are protected, 1 is vulnerable and 1 is endangered.

The vulnerable and endangered species are -

Members of the Cyperaceae family include the water chestnut and papyrus.

Proteaceae (Banksias, Grevilleas)
Broad-leaf Drumsticks Broad-leaf Drumsticks  (Isopogon anemonifolius)
Photo: Alan Page
There are 98 native species of the Proteaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 40 are protected, 5 are vulnerable and 5 are endangered.

The endangered species are -

The Waratah (Telopea speciosissima) is the floral emblem of NSW.

Ericaceae (Heaths)
Pink Swamp Heath Pink Swamp Heath  (Sprengelia incarnata)
Photo: Alan Page
There are 69 native species of the Ericaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 4 are protected, 2 are vulnerable and 1 is endangered.

The vulnerable and endangered species are -

Members of the Ericaceae family include the cranberry, blueberry, rhododendron and azaleas.

Rutaceae (Boronias)
Leionema lachnaeoides Leionema lachnaeoides  Photo: Alan Page
There are 66 native species of the Rutaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 36 are protected, 3 are vulnerable and 4 are endangered.

The endangered species are -

Members of the Rutaceae family include oranges, lemons and limes.

Lamiaceae (Mints)
Chloanthes glandulosa Chloanthes glandulosa
Photo: Robin Murray
There are 49 native species of the Lamiaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 4 are vulnerable.

The vulnerable species are -

Members of the Lamiaceae family include basil, mint, rosemary, sage, oregano, thyme and lavender, and the teak tree.

Rhamnaceae (Pomaderris)
Bitter Cryptandra Bitter Cryptandra  (Cryptandra amara)
Photo: Alan Page
There are 33 native species of the Rhamnaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 1 is vulnerable and 4 are endangered.

The endangered species are -

23 of the 33 species recorded as being in the GBMWHA belong to the Pomaderris genus. [I find it hard to identify the actual species.]

Apiaceae (Flannel Flowers)
Pink Flannel Flower Pink Flannel Flower  (Actinotus forsythii)
Photo: Alan Page
There are 31 native species of the Apiaceae family in the GBMWHA of which 5 are protected, 1 is vulnerable and 1 is endangered.

The vulnerable and endangered species are -

Members of the Apiaceae family include celery, carrot and parsley.

threatened species

There are 359 protected native species in the GBMWHA of which 52 are vulnerable and 43 are endangered.

Euphrasia bowdeniae Euphrasia bowdeniae (Vulnerable)
Photo: Alan Page

28 of the endangered species are included in the family description above - the remaining 15 are -

Here's a list of all threatened GBMWHA species.

More information on Threatened Species in NSW can be found here.

exotic or introduced species - weeds

There's about 400 exotic (introduced) flora species in the GBMWHA - 36 of these are declared noxious in the Blue Mountains LGA and 12 are Weeds of National Significance.

Pampas Grass Pampas Grass  (Cortaderia selloana)
Photo: Alan Page
The more well known noxious ones are -

Here's a list of the GBMWHA exotic species.

Gathering the data

The information used on this webpage is compiled from BioNet and PlantNET for the GBMWHA's seven national parks and the Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve in May 2016.

It was initially planned to prepare lists at a subspecies/variety level - but this turned out to be arduous and time consuming, as it requires detailed examination of each species so affected. This will have to wait until time permits.

Although comprehensive, the resulting lists are incomplete as they will change as -

It should be remembered that 65% of the million hectares of the GBMWHA is declared wilderness and is difficult to access.

In addition, BioNet makes the following qualification - "The data are only indicative and cannot be considered a comprehensive inventory, and may contain errors and omissions."

However, the lists provide a solid baseline of the GBMWHA flora - its diversity, breadth and splendour.